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53 of 3,651
Arches, Curves, and a Spiral Staircase Define This Sculptural Australian Home
Publisher:
Dwell
San Francisco, California, USA
Media, Architecture, Interior Design, Housing
Author: 
N/A
Date Published: 
2020-08-14
Keywords: 
Syndey, Australia, Single Family Home, Housing, Architecture, Renovation, Restoration
Tapestry Statistics:
ID: 
3794
Added: 
2020-08-17 16:33:10
Updated: 
2020-08-17 17:00:40
Content Score: 
11.29
Profile Views: 
50
Click Throughs: 
41
Image:
Peter Bennetts
Excerpt:
Chenchow Little architects devise a wondrous and efficient home for a family of five in Sydney.

In Sydney, Australia, architects Stephanie Little and Anthony Chenchow designed a family home that’s as artful as it is practical. "The clients are patrons of the arts, and they wanted a sculptural house that let in plenty of sunlight and that would still be functional for young children," Little says.

Located in the western inner suburb of Glebe, the house perches on a sandstone cliff and features views of Sydney’s glittering skyline. As remarkable as the views are, the series of curves and arches that define the home are equally striking.

"The existing weatherboard cottage, which had portions of its cladding replaced with asbestos sheeting, was dilapidated beyond repair and infested with termites," Little says. The architects tore down the existing construction and replaced it with a 2,163-square-foot home clad in white-painted vertical timber boarding that replicates the materiality of traditional Victorian cottages in the area.

The home’s form—similar to that of a triangle with blunt points—was informed by the wedge-shaped lot and the sight lines of the houses around it. "Our key challenge for this project was typical of an inner-city site," Little says. "We needed to get sunlight into the center of the floor plan while framing views of the outdoors and avoiding the closely sited neighboring dwellings."The wedge-like home has large, curved openings that reference the traditional arched windows and entrance porticos of neighboring Victorian houses. But unlike traditional Victorians, some of the arched openings are inverted.

"The arched windows on the elevation align with arched cutouts in the floor plate to create three-dimensional internal voids within the space," Little says. "The double-height voids maximize light penetration into the center of the dwelling and add to the sense of space."

The architects used the arched geometry to help frame and edit views of the landscape around the house. "The upturned arches have the greatest width at the top, where there’s abundant light," Little says. "They focus views to the canopies of trees, while screening the street and neighbors’ windows and boundary fences. An arch can also be pushed and pulled to suit different room sizes and heights."

Organizations Mentioned: (5)
Chenchow Little Architects
Surry Hills, New South Wales, Australia
Architecture
Lochbuild
Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia
Construction
Spirit Level
Surry Hills, New South Wales, Australia
Landscape Design
Taylor Consulting
Dee Why, New South Wales, Australia
Engineering, Structural, Civil
Windoor
Saint Marys, New South Wales, Australia
Timber Windows, Doors