About
Feedback
Login
NEWS
ORGANIZATIONS
PROJECTS
PRODUCTS
1 to 40 of 3361
KPF
Four blocks of Manhattan’s Far West Side were rezoned 14 years ago for New York’s ambitious 2012 Olympic bid. After a failed attempt to secure the games, the parcel of land was awarded in 2008 to real estate giant Related Companies. Through a public-private partnership in which Related would oversee the design, construction, and long-term maintenance of the site, the group began creating what’s now the largest private development in the history of the United States. Set atop a cluster of rail yards between 10th and 11th avenues, the first phase of the multibillion-dollar megaproject known as Hudson Yards is set to open on March 15, when a cohort of towers and parkland previously inaccessible to the public will be unveiled. Ahead of the much-anticipated launch date, here’s a brief look at what’s already opened and what’s coming online this spring.

10 Hudson Yards
Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF), this 895-foot-tall office tower was the first structure completed on-site in May of 2016 and features 1.8 million square feet of commercial space. It boasts tenants such as Coach, L’Oréal, Sidewalk Labs, VaynerMedia, and Boston Consulting Group, among others. A Spanish food hall by José Andrés will also be located in the building.

15 Hudson Yards
Rising 917 feet in the sky, this residential tower will offer 285 luxury apartments and 107 affordable rentals come March. The skinny skyscraper was designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) as lead architect and Rockwell Group as lead interior architect.

30 Hudson Yards
This commercial tower, also designed by KPF is the tallest in Hudson Yards, stretching 1,296 feet in the air, and is set to open in March. It features the city’s highest open-air observation deck, which will be open to the public in 2020. Major media groups such as HBO, CNN, Turner Broadcasting, Time Warner, and Wells Fargo Securities, are set to move in this March.

35 Hudson Yards
Also opening this spring, this mixed-use supertall tower was designed by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings + Merrill. It will house 143 condominiums, as well an Equinox Club at the base of its 92 floors. A branded hotel by the luxury fitness company will also open inside the structure.

Share:
Four blocks of Manhattan’s Far West Side were rezoned 14 years ago for New York’s ambitious 2012 Olympic bid. After a failed attempt to secure the games, the parcel of land was awarded in 2008 to real estate giant Related Companies. Through a public-private partnership in which Related would oversee the design, construction, and long-term maintenance of the site, the group began creating what’s now the largest private development in the history of the United States. Set atop a cluster of rail yards between 10th and 11th avenues, the first phase of the multibillion-dollar megaproject known as Hudson Yards is set to open on March 15, when a cohort of towers and parkland previously inaccessible to the public will be unveiled. Ahead of the much-anticipated launch date, here’s a brief look at what’s already opened and what’s coming online this spring.

Site plan of the complete Hudson Yards masterplan
Hudson Yards’ Phase 1, east of 11th Avenue, opens on March 15, but future buildings and parkland won’t be open until 2025. (Courtesy KPF)

10 Hudson Yards
Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF), this 895-foot-tall office tower was the first structure completed on-site in May of 2016 and features 1.8 million square feet of commercial space. It boasts tenants such as Coach, L’Oréal, Sidewalk Labs, VaynerMedia, and Boston Consulting Group, among others. A Spanish food hall by José Andrés will also be located in the building.

Photo of 15 Hudson Yards and the Bloomberg Building
At 88 stories tall, 15 Hudson Yards rises from the base of The Bloomberg Building, which houses The Shed. (
  0000-00-00
dezeen  0000-00-00
ArchitectureAU  0000-00-00
Archinect  0000-00-00
dezeen  0000-00-00
OFS
The winners of the 2019 Best of NeoCon Competition were announced on Monday June 10, during an awards breakfast hosted by Contract at the Renaissance Hotel in Chicago. Eighty-three awards were distributed in this year’s competition of contract furnishing products, including eight Innovation awards, six Editors’ Choice awards, and a Best of Competition prize.

The 2019 winners are:

Acoustic Panels & Solutions
Gold: Snowsound: FLAT
Silver: Luxxbox: Linea Acoustic LED Lighting System

Acoustic Privacy & Modular Solutions
Gold: OFS: Leant To
Silver: Framery Acoustics: Framery 2Q

Architectural & Decorative Glass

Silver: Skyline Design: Oblique & Chevron

Architectural Products
Gold and Best of Competition: OFS: Obeya
Silver: Connectrac: Flex

Carpet: Broadloom
Gold: Tarkett: Tatami System
Silver: Mohawk Group: Textural Effects

Carpet: Contract Area Rugs
Innovation: Mohawk Group: Connecting Neurons Definity

Carpet: Modular
Gold: Patcraft: Deconstructed Felt
Silver: Shaw Contract: Suited

Case Goods
Gold: HALCON: HALO Office
Silver: Herman Miller: Geiger One Casegoods

Conference Room Furniture
Gold: Nucraft: Alev
Innovation: Tuohy Furniture Corp.: Meich Tables
Silver: Andreu World: Reverse Wood

Education Solutions
Gold: VS America: JUMPER
Silver: Keilhauer: Buncha

Flooring: Hard Surface LVT & Planks
Gold: Patcraft: Handloom
Innovation: Metroflor Corp.: Metroforms with Attraxion Magnetic Attachment Technology
Silver: Milliken & Co.: Change Agent LVT

Furniture Collections for Collaboration
Gold: Steelcase: Flex Collection
Innovation: Teknion: Bene Box
Silver: STYLEX: Free Address

Furniture Systems & Enhancements
Gold: Watson Furniture Group: Cloud 9 Rail
Silver: HALCON: HALO Office

Furniture: Benching
Gold: Innovant: Cross Benching

Healthcare Fabrics & Textiles
Gold: Designtex: Biophilia 2.0
Silver: CF Stinson: Chiaroscuro Collection

Healthcare Flooring
Gold: Teknoflor: Coordination Collection
Silver: Mohawk Group: True Hues

Healthcare Guest & Lounge Seating
Gold: Kwalu: Prizzi Lounge
Healthcare Patient Seating
Silver: Spec Furniture: Tailor HD

Lighting: Decorative & Hospitality
Gold: Eaton: Shaper Sense Acoustic LED Luminaires
Silver: LightArt: Acoustic Wing

Lounge Furniture Collections
Gold: Haworth Inc.: Cabana Lounge
Silver: Andreu World: Rap Sofa

Movable Walls
Gold: Teknion: Tek Vue
Silver: Allsteel: Beyond Pavilion

Office Accessories
Gold: Allsteel: Radii
Silver: Watson Furniture Group: Cloud 9 Cart and Garage

Seating: Bar Stools
Editors’ Choice: Martin Brattrud: Cumbia
Gold: Davis Furniture Industries: Muse Barstool

Seating: Benches
Editors’ Choice: Nienkämper: Heartbeat
Gold: Green Furniture Concept: Nova C Perch
Silver: Allermuir: Axyl Bench

Seating: Conference
Gold: OFS: Kasura
Silver: Davis Furniture Industries: M75

Seating: Ergonomic Desk/Task
Gold: via seating: Younique
Silver: Nightingale Corp.: NLC

Seating: Guest
Gold: Allermuir: Kin
Silver: Andreu World: Gala

Seating: Outdoor Contract & Hospitality
Silver: Andreu World: Nuez Outdoor

Seating: Sofas & Lounge
Gold: Andreu World: Rap sofa
Silver: Green Furniture Concept: Nova C Recliner

Seating: Stacking
Gold: Sandler Seating: HDS 1.1
Silver: SitOnIt Seating | IDEON: Mika

Signage & Wayfinding
Gold: Takeform: Lucid Refined Interior Signage
Silver: 2/90 Sign Systems: SafeCare Signs

Space Dividers/Partitions/Screens
Gold: Clarus Glassboards: Flex Wall
Silver: Naava: Naava Flow

Tables: Communal & Task
Gold: Nucraft: Epono
Silver: Davis Furniture Industries: Inform

Tables: Height-Adjustable/Training/Work
Editors’ Choice: Versteel: Sky
Gold: Watson Furniture Group: Cloud 9 Desk
Silver: Senator International: Array

Tables: Occasional
Editors’ Choi
Hightower
The digital revolution has significantly and forever altered the way people conduct business and the way designers approach workplace design. The challenge remains: how to provide flexibility, comfort, support, and good aesthetics in today’s office. Interior designers not only need to find ingenious solutions that enable clients to keep pace with the increasing velocity of the digital revolution, but they must also discover ways to slow things down and inject beauty into their projects.

Hightower’s Spring/Summer 2018 collection aims to do just that, with a series of chairs, sofas, tables, benches, and sound-absorbing modular wall and ceiling treatments that elevate the workplace. The pièce de résistance is the Gimbal Lounge Rocker, designed by Justin Champaign, founder and principal designer of California-based studio Most Modest. Capable of both rocking and swiveling, the Gimbal provides release and comfort, allowing longer durations of seated, focused work to take place. In addition to a low-back option, a high-back version creates a refuge in public space by offering increased privacy and some sound-absorption capabilities.

“The speed at which people are working today is quickening at such a rapid rate that it creates a fun challenge for designers,” Champaign says. “We have to account for this even at the concept development stage, working swiftly to provide relevant solutions that solve today’s problems and evolve to solve tomorrow’s, as well. I think the Gimbal, created for Hightower, does that quite well.”
The Breck Benches and Ribbon Tables, also designed by Champaign for Hightower, are simple and sturdy. Multiple sizes, heights, and finishes create the possibility for flexible and productive workspaces.

“The collection is simple and fun, but so thoughtful at the same time. To me, that is Hightower,” says co-founder Natalie Hartkopf.

Hightower's Spring/Summer 2018 collection includes Scandinavia-based designers Form Us With Love, GamFratesi, and Zilenzio.

  0000-00-00
TWA Hotel/David Mitchell
“We need those to pay for this,” says developer Tyler Morse, standing in the middle of Eero Saarinen’s iconic TWA Flight Center at John F. Kennedy Airport. “Those” are the two seven-story, black-glass buildings containing 512 hotel rooms, built at a cost of about $200 million, and opening to the public today. “This” is the Flight Center, which Morse has spent about $65 million restoring to its former glory, and which now serves as a spectacular lobby for his TWA Hotel.

The two new buildings aren’t beautiful. But they are scaleless, detailess, banal—exactly what Morse needed them to be, so that they wouldn’t compete with Saarinen’s thin-shell concrete bird. “We wanted them to disappear,” he says of the new buildings. “At the same time, we wanted them to reflect Saarinen’s architecture.” That required trying out dozens of glass samples. Too mirror-y, and the new buildings looked garish. Not mirror-y enough, and they looked flat (and didn’t give hotel guests sufficient privacy).

Completed in 1962, the year after Saarinen died, the Flight Center was considered a triumph of architecture and engineering. But it proved impractical as planes got bigger and airport security tighter. It was abandoned in 2001 and robbed of some of its autonomy a few years later, when JetBlue built a large new terminal behind it.

But things could have been worse. There was talk of demolition until 1994, when the building— then only 32 years old—was landmarked. That year, the Flight Center’s owner, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, hired preservation expert Richard Southwick of Beyer Blinder Belle (BBB) to come up with a plan for saving and repurposing the building. In 2015, Morse’s development company, MCR, leased the property from the Port Authority and began planning the new hotel, with BBB as project and preservation architect. (Southwick, now BBB’s director of preservation, has worked on the building for 25 years.) Morse, a former investment banker and one-time LAX baggage handler, says he presented his plans to—and received the blessings of—some 14 preservation groups as well as the Finnish ambassador to the U.S., who wanted to make sure that Saarinen’s masterpiece would be well cared-for.

Under Morse’s plan, the Saarinen building was restored and repurposed, often with ingenuity and wit. TWA’s former check-in area is now the hotel’s check-in area (a conveyor belt behind the counter transports luggage to storage). And while there are many new amenities, including Warby Parker and Shinola stores and a Jean-Georges Vongerichten restaurant, the furniture is almost entirely by Saarinen’s contemporaries, including Isamu Noguchi, Warren Platner, and Raymond Loewy. (Morse even acquired Mies van der Rohe furniture from the old Four Seasons restaurant.) A Phaidon reading room has Herman Miller seating.

Saarinen’s famous red-carpeted tubes—which once led to TWA planes—now lead to the new hotel buildings, with their own long red-carpeted hallways. Atop one of the buildings is an infinity pool and observation deck; atop the other is a power plant that burns natural gas.

Morse couldn’t excavate below the Saarinen building (it sits on “a forest of piles,” Southwick reports), so he dug deep beneath the surrounding few acres, making room for 45 conference rooms and what he says is the largest hotel gym in the world. (INC Architecture & Design created many of the new public spaces.)

The guest rooms, their interiors by hotel experts Stonehill Taylor, have just the right mid-century look, with furniture by Saarinen, including womb chairs upholstered in “TWA red.” Their glass walls, made by Fabbrica, are an incredible seven panes and 4½ inches thick; they seemed to block out outside noise entirely. Rooms are about $250 a night. Those with views of Saarinen’s building are a few dollars more—and worth it.

  0000-00-00
Courtesy of Gensler
Now that office walls have come down, workers are ducking into closet-sized “pods” for privacy and quiet. Is this a retreat from the open office or the next phase of it?

After 30 minutes in the anechoic test chamber, you start to hear your heart beating. Then, you can make out the joints crinkling in your arms and legs, the carotid arteries pumping in your head, and maybe, if you listen very closely, the air flowing in and out of your lungs.

“Every sound [people inside] hear is the sound of their own body,” said Steve Orfield, who runs Orfield Laboratories, an acoustic lab in Minneapolis where scientists test the decibel levels of Harley-Davidsons and the way sound reverberates off concert-hall chairs.

Of all the very quiet spaces in his lab, the anechoic chamber is the quietest. It was once the Quietest Place on Earth, holding the Guinness World Record as such until 2015, when another chamber out-quieted it. Spending too long in a tank like this can drive a person crazy. But people visit from all over the world, paying hundreds of dollars for the chance to deprive their senses in small doses. One of the reasons they are seeking quiet and calm, Orfield says, is because all around them is chaos and noise.

For many American workers, one of the most chaotic vessels they occupy—sonically and otherwise—is also where they spend most of their weekday waking hours: the open office.

“They’re way too bright, they’re way too contrast-y, and they’re way too loud,” said Orfield of the model. “Everything about them is designed to be essentially the opposite of what the user would like.”

This is the overwhelming sense, supported by research: That the open floor plan, distracting and disruptive and encouraging of over-shoulder lurking, does more harm than good to American workers. Still, by 2017, a survey estimated that seven in 10 offices had lowered their partitions, driven by rising real estate costs and a desire to smooth out hierarchies and encourage more co-worker-on-co-worker face time.

Now, as open-office backlash mounts, companies are trying to figure out a way to bring back the privacy of the closed-plan office but without the square footage. To do it, they’re buying their own mini-isolation chambers in the form of personal phone booths, or “pods.”

Nicknamed “cubicle nouveau” by Fast Company, the half-dozen-odd pod brands on the market—including Cubicall, Zenbooth, TalkBox, Orange Box and ROOM—are indeed a bit like revamped personal cubicles carved out of a phone-booth shell. They’re often outfitted with svelte glass doors and are filled with some variation of chair, plugs, phone, and maybe an airplane-tray-table-sized desk. Some are built for one; others are designed for meetings and can hold up to four. Prices vary widely: about $3,500 for a solo unit from ROOM, and up to $16,000 for one with higher occupancy from Zenbooth.

For Brian Chen and Morton Meisner, the co-founders of ROOM, inspiration to craft a pod sprung from the relatable pressure point they encountered working in an open-plan startup space. “It’s just really stressful if you’re trying to focus and you’re listening to your neighbor chat with his or her dentist,” Chen said. So they cobbled together a homemade phone booth out of plywood and foam, and slapped a door on it.

“The booth that we built ended up being called the ‘sweatbox,’ because you go inside, there’s no ventilation, and you’re pretty miserable,” Chen said. Slowly, they finessed the model, and launched a company last year. By the end of this year, ROOM projects it will have done $40 million in sales to over 1,500 businesses, ranging from small startups to brands like Nike and financial institutions such as J.P. Morgan.

“The problem … in terms of soundproofing really affects companies of all sizes,” Chen said.

First, offices spurned walls. Now, they’re looking to score furniture that can, in some ways, replace them.

Another day in cubicle paradise

We can blame Frank Lloyd Wright for designing one of the first American open offices in 1939. Driven by the belief that interior walls and rooms were restrictive and hierarchical, Wright slashed them from his plan for the Johnson Wax headquarters in Racine, Wisconsin. He was one of a group of architects who “thought that to break down the social walls that divide people, you had to break down the real walls, too,” as George Musser wrote in Scientific American.

But sprawling, desk-filled rooms punctuated by a few boss’s offic
  0000-00-00
  0000-00-00
The Seattle Times  0000-00-00