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Eric Laignel
From the outside, the new headquarters of Wörwag—a maker of industrial paints and coatings based in Stuttgart, Germany—resembles a glowing, elongated Rubik’s Cube. Even if you didn’t know the company specialized in color, one glance at the rainbow-banded building would offer a pretty substantial clue. That, of course, was the goal, and the reason why the manufacturer brought on Interior Design Hall of Fame members Peter Ippolito and Gunther Fleitz and their Ippolito Fleitz Group to design the project. Stuttgart is home to scores of important corporations, including Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and Bosch. But most of them aren’t household names. Rather, they’re “hidden champions,” as Peter Ippolito puts it, behind-the-scenes yet globally influential B2B enterprises, many working in or adjacent to the automotive sector. While they may be outside the purview of the average consumer, however, these companies still need to stand out within their respective industries, which is where IFG comes in. “We have a saying, ‘Identity is the new facility,’” Ippolito continues. “Workplace design is not only about orga­nizing processes but also about branding. If you don’t translate the company’s DNA into a space, it’s just a bunch of nicely arranged tables.”

Wörwag was keenly aware of that principle. Having constructed a four-story, 38,000-square-foot building wrapped entirely in glass—already a big statement for a medium-size business—the manufacturer sought interiors that channeled its passion for color and commitment to technological innovation. It couThat effort begins in the lobby, the drywall panels of its folded-plate ceiling painted various shades of yellow—“an active color that has a sense of focus and clarity,” Fleitz notes. Behind the reception desk, backlit shelves showcase dozens of brightly painted car parts, bicycle frames, and other bits of machinery that illustrate a wide range of Wörwag coating applications.

nted on Ippolito and Fleitz to use these brand signifiers to broadcast the company’s core values inside and outside the structure’s transparent walls.

Right next to the lobby lies one of the project’s key elements: The company cafeteria, a facility that’s typically hidden away on an upper floor but is here given pride of place, a democratic mingling ground for visitors, management, and factory workers alike. Decked out with violet ceiling panels, neon-blue benches, dark-orange wall tiles, and draperies in a shade of red known to make food look more appetizing, it was conceived to foster unexpected connections. “The idea was, Can I get a finance employee to meet one from production and they learn something from one another?” Fleitz explains. “That’s when innovation happens. It’s a strong statement that the company chooses to put this kind of space front and center.”

Upstairs, on the building’s three office levels, color plays an even larger role. The rainbow effect visible from outside is due primarily to a continuous ribbon of dropped ceilings that encircles each floor, progressing through a gradient of 70 different shades along the way. Comprising textile-covered acoustic panels arranged in a folded plate similar to those in the lobby and cafeteria, each floating ceiling acts like a pitched roof above the open work­stations lining perimeter walls, providing a feeling of privacy and a unique visual identity, “as in, Come find me in lemon-yellow,” Ippolito jokes.

Similar multihued textile-covered panels, some shaped like Wörwag’s signature paint chips, are suspended vertically from the ceiling as moveable dividers between work areas. These elements reflect Ippolito and Fleitz’s theories about workplace culture and how it informs their design decisions: “We always talk about it like an onion,” Ippolito states. “The first layer is, ‘I’m proud to be part of the company.’ The next is, ‘I’m proud to be in the building,’ and then, ‘my department, my team, and my desk.’ We try to enable that sense of belonging on every level.” Even in an open-plan setup, he says, “You have to make people feel special, so they don’t feel like a number.”

While individual workstations and a gradient ceiling mark the perimeter of each floor, the inner areas have a very different vibe. They are devoted to meeting rooms and other collaborative spaces, marked by a palette that’s pr
Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.
Dive Brief:
  • Contractors have filed $15.8 million worth of mechanics liens on the stalled $300 million Royal Caribbean Cruises headquarters expansion in Miami, according to Miami-Dade County public records. Of those companies that have filed liens, two contractors have been paid a total of $230,493, leaving an unpaid balance of almost $15.6 million as of Aug. 24.
  • Baker Concrete Construction has the largest active lien against the Royal Caribbean project, located at the Port of Miami, in the amount of almost $11.7 million, followed by Kenneth Brest, a sub-subcontractor hired by Baker. Brest has filed liens totaling almost $2.7 million. Other active lienholders are Gancedo Lumber, which claims it is owed $84,434, and Keller North America, which says it is owed more than $1.1 million.
  • Project developer CBRE and general contractor Plaza Construction announced the start of construction on what Royal Caribbean characterized as Miami's "first true corporate campus" last summer. In March, however, Royal Caribbean announced it had halted construction due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Dive Insight:

Construction Dive reached out to Royal Caribbean about the liens but had not received a response by press time.

During the company's second-quarter 2020 earnings call earlier this month, Richard Fain, Royal Caribbean CEO and president, said all capital projects had been postponed or canceled as the cruise industry waits to "get beyond this epidemic."

The company recently announced that it secured a $700 million loan facility from Morgan Stanley but said the proceeds, if drawn, would be used for general corporate purposes. There was no specific mention of paying past due bills on the headquarters project in Miami.

Royal Caribbean reported a $1.3 billion adjusted net loss after having to cancel all its cruises in the second quarter.

When asked about the mechanics liens filed against the property, Plaza representative Jorge Moros did not verify the lien amounts but confirmed to Construction Dive that Royal Caribbean had asked them to stop work.

"The parties are working together to amicably resolve all matters arising from the stoppage of the work," he said.

If the HQ project moves forward after the pandemic has run its course, the 350,000-square foot, 10-story office building will allow Royal Caribbean to double its workforce in Miami. Amenities at the new complex will include a fitness center, multiple sport courts, a soccer field, a parking garage and electric car chargers.

In May, notice and lien service provider Levelset reported that mechanics lien filings in the U.S. had increased by 40% from January through March 2020. At the time, company CEO Scott Wolfe said contractors were likely protecting themselves given the uncertain nature of the coronavirus spread and its effect on their projects and customer payments.

According to Justin Gitelman, content partnerships coordinator at, the company's most recent lien data shows that the number of mechanics liens that U.S. contractors filed in May and June fell slightly — 5,810 to 5,525 respectively — but the total value of liens increased from $469 million to $472 million. Preliminary July data indicates that the number of liens filed has also decreased, he said, as well as the total amount.
Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times
In a neighborhood dominated by terrestrial pursuits such as steel distribution and package delivery, Blue Origin has erected a bulbous, blue-and-white, U-shaped structure that looks like a dry run for a lunar apartment complex.

It’s the new Kent headquarters for Jeff Bezos’ space exploration company, built for 1,500 employees.

“We’re going to fly humans, we’re going to build and design large engines as well as large rockets, and go back to the moon — all based from here in Kent,” company CEO Bob Smith told a large group of employees and contractors, along with half a dozen local politicians, at a ribbon-cutting ceremony Monday.

He said Blue Origin’s workforce grew by one-third last year, and “will continue to grow at that pace.” Between Kent and its facilities elsewhere, the company has more than 2,500 employees.

Blue Origin has a crowded agenda for 2020. It aims to fly its first human payload this year, though Smith emphasized that ensuring the safety of those first travellers will dictate the schedule. The company this year also plans to deliver the first of its BE-4 engines, which will be produced commercially in Huntsville, Alabama, and “we’re making production parts now” for the massive New Glenn rocket designed to repeatedly carry people and payloads to Earth orbit and beyond.

Its New Shepard rocket — the launch vehicle seen repeatedly climbing to the edge of space and then maneuvering back to a landing pad, much like the Falcon 9, made by Blue Origin rival SpaceX — completed its 12th flight last year. The company is taking names for “early access” to reservations for ticket-buying “astronauts” with the promise that “at the apex of your 11-minute flight, you will float above the thin limb of the atmosphere and gaze upon the Earth below.”

Along with its new headquarters, Blue Origin has a nearby building where workers toil amid a collection of real space artifacts and some science-fiction counterparts from “Star Trek” and Jules Verne.

The new building — a peaked, elongated blob assembled from metal panels — was built in less than a year, Smith said. After a January start, he said, Blue Origin vowed to celebrate the holidays in the new structure, so the mandate was, “You can cancel Christmas or you can get this done.”

Inside, a prototype of the company’s proposed Blue Moon lunar lander dominates the lobby of the 230,000-square-foot building. Despite the structure’s high ceiling, it contains just one story of offices and an occasional loft-style upstairs gathering space.

In October, the company announced plans to partner with Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Draper to build the Blue Moon lander and offer it to NASA for its upcoming Artemis program, which aims to send astronauts back to the moon’s surface by 2024.

Blue Origin is opaque about its finances, but Bezos said in 2017 at a space conference that “my business model right now for Blue Origin is I sell about a billion a year of Amazon stock and I use it to fund Blue Origin. … So the business model for Blue Origin is very robust.”

Peter Molick
Brierley+Partners runs loyalty and customer relationship programs for companies that include 7-Eleven and Hertz, so naturally the firm’s management wanted to inspire the same good feelings in their own employees when moving into 56,700 square feet of a new office building in Frisco, Texas. “They wanted to support employee well-being and create a fun yet professional space for their mix of creative software engineers, finance, and administration,” says Melissa Cooksey, Perkins and Will’s senior interior project manager, associate principal.

Those inspirations are all over the interiors: Graphic wallcoverings help liven up and carve out open workspaces, as do glass-film graphics across glass meeting rooms and office fronts, while writeable walls are at the ready whenever inspiration strikes. The new space includes twice as much, and twice as many kinds, of collaboration and conference areas, not to mention a gym and breakroom with its own kegerator.

Bright colors and bold patterns keep things lively. But, Cooksey notes, “the open area ceilings have K-13 acoustic spray, in white and gray, crisply divided on ceiling deck and HVAC ductwork.” And while the client wanted a space to help position them for future growth, that didn’t necessarily mean straight lines and rational finishes. “The wood veneer wallcovering installation and the adjacent subway tiles,” she says, “are both on a 45-degree angle. It’s an eclectic vibe.”



Adobe / Gensler
Adobe Inc. on Monday held a groundbreaking ceremony for its new 1.3 million-square-foot downtown San Jose office tower, marking a symbolic milestone for the Bay Area’s largest city.

The glassy, 18-story tower is rising at 333 W. San Fernando St., across the street from Adobe's existing headquarters. The software maker is already downtown San Jose's largest private employer and will more than double its workforce in the city with the addition of the new building, which will be able to accommodate 4,000 additional workers.

Adobe co-founder John Warnock, who started the company in 1982 with co-founder Chuck Geschke, took the stage at the groundbreaking ceremony, explaining their decision in the early 1990s to move the company from Mountain View to San Jose. Despite being the Bay Area’s largest city, San Jose is still working to shake its reputation as a bedroom community for the rest of Silicon Valley.

“We worked very closely with (former San Jose Mayor) Tom McEnery and later with Susan Hammer, and the city of San Jose was the most welcoming city that we were able to deal with,” Warnock said at the event.

These days, Adobe is a Fortune 500 company with 21,000 employees worldwide and a market value of close to $150 billion. “It was John and Chuck's vision that put Adobe on the map in the business world, but actually it was also John and Chuck's vision that put Adobe on the map in San Jose,” Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen said at the event.

That decision by Adobe 25 years ago to plant itself in downtown San Jose was visionary, San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo said.

“I know it's not obvious to us now as we see tech expanding in urban centers, but certainly in the 1990s that wasn't the pattern,” Liccardo said. “We saw largely the corporate equivalent of gated communities in suburban parts of our Valley. And that's the way Silicon Valley operated, with tilt-up buildings surrounded by a sea of parking. And John and Chuck had a different vision and that was the vision for an urban campus.”

A glassy pedestrian skybridge will connect the new building to Adobe’s existing three-tower headquarters, which is bounded by Park Avenue, Almaden Boulevard, West San Fernando Street and the Guadalupe River Trail and Highway 87. The new tower will be all-electric and, like Adobe’s existing campus, be LEED certified for environmental standards, company executives said at the event.

Adobe purchased the already-entitled 2.5-acre site for its new tower for $68 million in early 2018 from Bay Area investors and developers John and Phil DiNapoli and Lew Wolff.


“We outgrew our campus and we couldn’t pull the trigger fast enough on a new building,” Scott Ekman, Adobe’s senior director of global real estate, explained at a Silicon Valley Business Journal event in January. “Now we are ready to roll.”

The company expects construction to wrap up by 2022. San Mateo-based Sares Regis Group of Northern California is the development manager for the project. The company has in the past worked on the Silicon Valley corporate headquarters for Electronic Arts, Nvidia, Symantec Corp. and others.

Milpitas-based Devcon Construction is the general contractor for Adobe's new tower and Gensler is the architecture firm.
Adam Mørk / International Olympic Committee
Copenhagen studio 3XN has completed Olympic House, a new headquarters for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Lausanne, Switzerland.

3XN collaborated with Swiss architecture office IttenBrechbühl to create the building, which has been designed around the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) principles.

"We designed the building around five key objectives that translate the Olympic movement's core values into built form: movement, transparency, flexibility, sustainability, and collaboration," Kim Herforth Nielsen, co-founder of 3XN, told Dezeen.

Built within a public park on the shore of Lake Geneva, Olympic House stands next to 18th-century castle Château de Vidy. Created as offices for the organisation's 500 staff, many of the building's elements reference the Olympics.

"Every part of the building has a meaning," said Jan Ammundsen, head of design at 3XN.

"From the dynamic glass facade that mimics the high-powered athleticism of an Olympic athlete, to the central staircase that references the iconic Olympic rings and the spirit of international collaboration that they represent."

The five-storey building is wrapped in a glass facade, which was created using parametric design – a digital process that allows you to test various design iterations.

Appearing differently from all angles, it is intended to represent the energy of an athlete. It also allows visitors to the park to see inside the building and observe the workings of the Olympic organisation.

"The visual transparency of the building is a metaphor for the new direction of the IOC as they strive towards a greater organisational transparency, reflected in the overall structural changes initiated by the Olympic Agenda 2020," explained Nielsen.

"The glass facade allows the daily work of the building’s inhabitants to be visible from the outside, and aThe headquarters is arranged around a central atrium, with all five storeys connected by the Unity Staircase.

lso celebrates its particular location by providing stunning views of the lake beyond."

This oak staircase, which has been designed to references the five rings on the Olympic flag, is surrounded by a meeting rooms and exhibition spaces, with a cafeteria on the ground floor.

"The staircase is designed to be visual expression of unity and collaboration within the organisation and the Olympic Games," added Nielsen.

Around the central atrium the offices have been designed to follow the Olympic core values of collaboration, flexibility and movement.

"At 3XN we believe that architecture shapes behaviour – thus, we have designed the interior with as few structural constraints as possible, in order to facilitate interaction and communication among the staff," added Ammundsen.

"The offices can be easily moved though the open spaces, and workspaces can be modified to suite the ever-changing needs of the organisation."
Garrett Rowland
Perkins+Will has overhauled the North American headquarters of consumer goods company Unilever, with new communal areas designed to help employees forget they're in a suburban office park.

British-Dutch manufacturer Unilever has long had its North American headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, just across the river from New York City.

But increasingly, the company has needed a more dynamic work environment to help recruit employees.

rchitecture firm Perkins+Will was charged with rethinking the corporate campus, which accommodates about 1,450 employees and several hundred independent contractors.

The goal was to create a showpiece headquarters that would be "smart, sustainable and Instagram-ready – with a feeling like you were in Manhattan".

Rather that razing the site and starting fresh, the architects chose to renovate four existing rectilinear buildings. They also added a lofty central atrium that rises 40 feet (12 metres) on the site of a former courtyard.

"The 325,000-square-foot renovation included interiors, as well as the construction of an entry pavilion and common area that stitched together the open space between individual buildings to create an entirely new, enclosed structure," said the firm.

The existing buildings, which date back to the 1960s and 70s, are completely revamped.

Traditional, cellular layouts are replaced with open workspaces, huddle rooms and lounges. Because there are no assigned desks, lockers have also been added, providing employees with a secure place for their belongings.

The central volume houses The Marketplace, where employees can shop, work and socialise. The vast, light-filled space features cafe tables and a giant staircase that doubles as seating.

Additional amenities at the campus include coffee stations, a fitness centre, a hair salon and a cafeteria.

Throughout the facility, concrete floors and exposed ceilings give interior spaces an industrial look. Wooden decor and eclectic furnishings help soften the atmosphere. In one area, the team created a living room, complete with a fireplace set within a brick wall.

The building features a range of smart technologies, including thousands of sensors that measure light, temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide and human presence.

"The final building design incorporates smart technologies by EDGE that record data and automate the building's features and functions, including internet-of-things systems that enable the building to learn from occupants' behaviours and remember their preferences," the team said.

In addition to the smart systems, the building's sustainable elements include solar panels and ample natural light.

During construction, 75 per cent of the construction material was diverted away from landfills. To help reduce car usage by employees, the company offers a shuttle service from New York City, Hoboken and Jersey City.
James John Jetel
These days, workplaces often contain cafés, wellness rooms, and lounges galore. But a bar? Not as likely... let alone four of them. But such is the case at the North American headquarters of the Campari Group—the Milan-based company famous for its bright-red namesake aperitif—that now also counts more than 50 other beverage brands in its portfolio, some of them, including Wild Turkey and Skyy Vodka, Amer­ican. Mix them all together, and it makes Campari Group the sixth largest spirits company in the world—a feat worthy of celebrating. Gensler helped the group do so with its new two-story New York office.

But first, some background. When the U.S. became Campari’s biggest sales market, executives decided to move the company from its San Francisco headquarters east. New York would be closer to Milan and other parts of its empire and help recruit top talent. “It’s the center of the action,” Ugo Fiorenzo, Campari America managing director, says of the city. He and his team selected two upper floors in the landmarked W. R. Grace building, doubling work space to 65,000 square feet and affording views of neighboring Bryant Park. “We were looking for that wow effect,” Fiorenzo adds.

“Don’t think all anyone does is party around here—foremost, this is designed for work.”

To live up to the expectation, Gensler principal and design director Stefanie Shunk made a pilgrimage to Milan to steep herself in the company’s 159-year history and culture, which includes decades worth of art, among it posters commissioned in the early 1900s from Fortunato Depero and Leonetto Cappiello. Once back, she translated her inspirations into the design of the workplace, drawing on furnishings from such companies as Foscarini and Minotti and employing such luxe materials as Italian leather. “You gotta love it,” Shunk says as she trails her fingers over the hide covering the walls of the elevator lobby. She and her team specified it and much of the furniture upholstery in a deep blue similar to that in the Campari logo.

Further in, not a typical reception desk but an espresso bar—with barista—greets visitors, looking like it could have been spirited from Corso Magenta in Milan. In the shape of the letter C, its counter is topped in marble, Italian, of course, and features a brass footrest. Just behind it is another wow element: Gensler carved a double-height atrium through the two floors and inserted a 16-foot-tall cerused-oak wall assemblage inspired by a Depero brick artwork on a building facade in Italy. The installation here serves as a backdrop to a full-scale bar, also C-shape but in buffed brass, on the floor below. Dubbed the Fortunato bar, the environment has the look and feel of an urban five-star hotel.

The feeling changes to that of floating inside a bottle of Campari in the stairway connecting the floors. Walls, floor, and ceiling are drenched in carmine red, and LED strips along the coves and treads instill a nightlife vibe. A grid of steel-mesh lockers at the landing exhibits bottles of rare liquors produced by the Campari Group. Glimpsed through the lockers is an ornate crystal chandelier. Arrive there to find it suspended over yet another bar, this one inside a tall, slender jewel box. Intimate and hermetic, its walls are covered in an old-fashioned taupe damask pattern, and the bar proper is an elaborately carved mahogany antique. Inspired by a prohibition-era speakeasy, this Boulevardier Bar—named for the cocktail of sweet vermouth, bourbon, and, yes, Campari originating at Harry’s New York Bar in 1920’s Paris—is where top customers visiting the HQ are invited to sip special-edition whiskeys, rums, and liqueurs. It’s a wonder of a space.

Making sure the Campari bars not only look exceptional but also function extremely well “was the thing that kept me up at night,” says Shunk, who watched GoPro videos of bartenders at work to learn exactly where the sink, ice, and other components needed to be. That knowledge was essential to designing the office’s lablike academy, where master mixologists concoct cocktails and bartenders come for training. The café, which occupies a whole corner of a floor plate, functions as yet another bar, one that, with its brick wall, large windows, and Campari motto—”toasting life together,” rendered in neon—was intended to evoke and bring in the city.
Breet Beyer Photography
When Sotheby’s unveiled its revamped New York headquarters earlier this month, the art installations within the new galleries rivaled any in the venerated museums—the Met, Met Breuer, Frick, Guggenheim—within walking distance of it on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. But the 275-year-old auction house isn’t competing with those neighboring institutions. “The art market is changing so rapidly and substantially,” says Allan Schwartzman, Sotheby’s executive vice president and chairman of the fine-art division. “We envision programming well beyond the historical core of our business.”

Sotheby’s had been considering leaving its home of nearly 20 years, a 10-story building that covers an entire city block, for a move to Midtown. Says Schwartzman, “There were fundamental limitations to displaying art in, and moving through, our building,”—a four-story former factory onto which six stories were added in a 2001 project by KPF. Sotheby’s engaged several architects to develop designs for a new space it had selected, but also to reimagine its existing building—in order to convince the board that a move was necessary.

Ironically, the scheme by OMA NY partner Shohei Shigematsu convinced them otherwise. “There are columns every 20 feet on the lower levels,” Schwartzman explains. “But Shohei found a way to embed columns in walls, or, when visible, to become a prominent feature of the architecture.”

“Brands reach out to architects when they are rethinking their brand,” says Shigematsu. “So it’s about much more than the architecture.” Here, though, in OMA’s first major gallery space in the U.S., the architectural moves—in some cases drastic, like slicing through floor slabs to create double-height galleries, in others subtle, such as lining the thresholds into gallery clusters with custom-stained walnut panels in a nod to Sotheby’s London—offer the auction house ideal ways to show art and luxury goods in isolation and in broader combination. All galleries were moved to the lower four levels, increasing exhibition space from 67,000 to over 90,000 square feet. The new configuration is more welcoming to the public and eliminates the bottleneck of traffic to what had been its premiere exhibition space on the 10th floor, which will be converted to offices. “There’s no hierarchy now,” notes Schwartzman. The $55 million project includes 40 new galleries of 20 distinct types—from white cube to enfilade, octagonal, and L-shaped—that range in size and materials to respond to different sales, exhibitions, and events, and allow the auction house to easily and frequently change out shows without disrupting other galleries or building temporary walls. “Flexibility is provided through diversity,” says Shigematsu.

Adds Schwartzman, “Having these redesigned galleries positions us to be able to grow the business in ways that we don’t even know about, but that will be needs of the near and further future.” In the meantime, the new space served as the perfect backdrop for Monday night's record-breaking sales, which included the $110.7 million sale of Meules (1890)—the highest sum ever paid for a work by Claude Monet, or any Impressionist work of art.
Make the Road NY; TEN Arquitectos
The new home for Make the Road New York, a leading immigrant rights group, aspires to be a transparent gathering place in an age of walls.

While sitting in the crowded waiting area of Make the Road New York’s storefront offices in Queens, formerly a Blockbuster video outlet, I think about my grandmother. She left Poland at 18 and, working as a seamstress along the way, immigrated to America in the late 19th century. She eventually opened a Kosher restaurant in Hoboken, N.J., where my mother grew up, safely, happily, and far from the nightmare that overtook the family that remained in Poland. It doesn’t take much empathy or imagination to make the connection between my family’s story—more or less the story of most American families—and those of the people around me on a March afternoon, mainly Spanish-speaking women, waiting for healthcare counseling or an appointment with a lawyer. Until recently, the scene at Make the Road New York (MRNY) would have been just another heartwarming portrait of the American fabric, part of the melting pot or the gorgeous mosaic. We used to be proud of our immigrant heritage, of our openness to those seeking a better place to live.

With over 23,000 dues-paying members, MRNY is one of New York City’s most formidable immigrant rights organizations. Founded in 2007 as a merger of two smaller groups, it has taken on a wide range of issues that affect immigrant communities: workers’ rights, access to healthcare, and all the problems associated with the current administration’s punitive approach to immigration law. MRNY, which derives its name from a poem by the Spanish writer Antonio Machado (“Searcher, there is no road. We make the road by walking.”), used to be famous, locally at least, for its work on behalf of the carwasheros, the men who dry and buff newly washed cars, mostly for tips (which were often pilfered by the management). Since the dawn of the Trump administration, MRNY has increasingly been on the front lines of a cultural and political war, protesting almost daily. The waiting area where I sat was decorated with artifacts of those demos, cardboard signs shaped like butterflies, with slogans like “Resist,” “Rise Up,” and “Here to Stay.”

Home > Design > TEN Arquitectos Designs a Beacon for the Resistance
DESIGN
Posted on: May 07, 2019 2





LETTER FROM NEW YORK
TEN Arquitectos Designs a Beacon for the Resistance
The new home for Make the Road New York, a leading immigrant rights group, aspires to be a transparent gathering place in an age of walls.
By KARRIE JACOBS

Courtesy Make the Road NY; TEN Arquitectos
While sitting in the crowded waiting area of Make the Road New York’s storefront offices in Queens, formerly a Blockbuster video outlet, I think about my grandmother. She left Poland at 18 and, working as a seamstress along the way, immigrated to America in the late 19th century. She eventually opened a Kosher restaurant in Hoboken, N.J., where my mother grew up, safely, happily, and far from the nightmare that overtook the family that remained in Poland. It doesn’t take much empathy or imagination to make the connection between my family’s story—more or less the story of most American families—and those of the people around me on a March afternoon, mainly Spanish-speaking women, waiting for healthcare counseling or an appointment with a lawyer. Until recently, the scene at Make the Road New York (MRNY) would have been just another heartwarming portrait of the American fabric, part of the melting pot or the gorgeous mosaic. We used to be proud of our immigrant heritage, of our openness to those seeking a better place to live.

With over 23,000 dues-paying members, MRNY is one of New York City’s most formidable immigrant rights organizations. Founded in 2007 as a merger of two smaller groups, it has taken on a wide range of issues that affect immigrant communities: workers’ rights, access to healthcare, and all the problems associated with the current administration’s punitive approach to immigration law. MRNY, which derives its name from a poem by the Spanish writer Antonio Machado (“Searcher, there is no road. We make the road by walking.”), used to be famous, locally at least, for its work on behalf of the carwasheros, the men who dry and buff newly washed cars, mostly for tips (which were often pilfered by the management). Since the dawn of the Trump administration, MRNY has increasingly been on the front lines of a cultural and political war, protesting almost daily. The
Gensler, via thyssenkrupp
New North American headquarters of elevator giant thyssenkrupp is called company’s highest profile project

One of suburban Atlanta’s most prominent towers is officially a go.

Fortune Global 500 company thyssenkrupp Elevator broke ground this week on its new North American headquarters next door to Cobb County’s burgeoning mixed-use hub The Battery, home of the Atlanta Braves’s stadium.

Scheduled to open in 2021, the headquarters complex will be punctuated by a 420-foot elevator test tower that would be Cobb’s tallest building. For context, Sandy Springs’s “King and Queen” towers at Concourse Corporate Center each stand about 100 feet higher, ranking them among the tallest suburban high-rises in the nation.

According to officials with Atlanta-based Collins Project Management, which is spearheading the tower’s development, the project will be thyssenkrupp’s most “high-profile” in the country.

Atop the vertical testing facility, three floors will be reserved for special functions, providing panoramic views of the city, officials revealed this week.

Beyond the tower, the project will include an adjacent, shorter building for thyssenkrupp’s business and engineering functions.

The combined projects are expected to cost $200 million. Officials have said the complex could house some 900 full-time thyssenkrupp employees, lured in no small part by Cobb tax breaks and other incentives.

As development goes, the groundbreaking marks another feather in the rapidly evolving Cumberland area’s cap.

Nearby, the Braves Development Company in August unveiled plans for an Aloft hotel at The Battery. High-end apartment complexes continue to sprout, touting proximity to the stadium’s environs.

And a mile from the ballpark, the Platinum Tower office complex has signed tenants galore—a testament, officials say, to the economic surge the Cumberland district is experiencing.
3XN
Countless athletes contemplate the Olympics in the context of their future—architects, however, not so much. Kim Herforth Nielsen, founder and senior partner of Denmark-based architecture firm 3XN was one of the few to win a truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work with the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Nielsen led his team of talented designers and architects to create the new headquarters of the IOC, called Olympic House.

Out of 118 firms, his was selected to redesign the IOC's headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. After nearly three years of construction, the project is nearing its completion. IOC President Thomas Bach worked closely with Nielsen's team to lead the project's design direction. Two of the most poignant concepts President Bach wanted the design to articulate were sustainability and transparency. Nielsen and his team certainly delivered; the build is LEED platinum-certified, and has reused 90 percent of the concrete from the previous headquarters that was demolished to make way for the new build.

Like its predecessor, the headquarters is located in Lausanne's Louis Bourget public Park. The headquarters is an open campus, and the public is able to walk right up to the building's exterior. Fully transparent window treatments allow in ample light and views of the surrounding park, and create a connection between the public and the committee's work inside the building itself.

One of the standout design features of the build is the circular staircase that connects each floor of the five-story building. It's a stunning homage to Pierre de Coubertin’s iconic Olympic Rings, and at present is almost entirely completed.

The building will house the 206 Olympic committees—more than even the United Nations has, according to President Bach—and will open with a ceremony on June 23, 2019.
BIG
bjarke ingels group unveils its new york headquarters in DUMBO, one of brooklyn’s most dynamic, forward-looking neighborhoods. the 50,000-square-foot studio occupies the entire block with space for over 250 employees on one floor and with plenty of room to grow. as the revitalized industrial neighborhood is situated along new york’s east river, the continuous glazing which lines the open-plan studio offers panoramic views of the adjacent manhattan skyline. designed and planned by BIG’s interiors team, the office is characterized by repeating elements which offer a coherent continuity to the sweeping, open space.

the bjarke ingels group studio space is sited at 45 main street, directly between the monumental brooklyn and manhattan bridges. the neighborhood is defined by its like-minded creative residents and design-oriented companies. developed by two trees management, the BIG studio offers a range of opportunity for collaborative work. a private rooftop for gathering and conference meetings, in addition to the pre-existing 9,500-square-foot roof space designed by james corner field operations. the full-sized cafeteria is commonly used for informal meetings and events throughout the year. the scale of the building allowed for the expansion of BIG’s workshop, which includes two large fabrication and assembly spaces with wood working and digital fabrication.

the lofty interiors offer space for the studio’s large-scale models and furniture mockups. a gallery along the south side connects east to west. this gallery is flanked on one end by exhibition shelves with the studio library for building samples opposite. the space is illuminated by a grid of 150 pendants designed by kibisi across the north side, and a variety from the ‘alphabet of light‘ series by BIG with artemide. transparent enclosed meeting rooms feature scoop-chairs organized by color, with hues ranging hot to cold. the visual continuity of the massive studio is further obtained with the use of three unique steel finishes — chromatized steel, hot rolled steel and galvanized steel — which are strategically incorporated throughout the space.



Microsoft
Computer software giant Microsoft is moving along in its efforts to replace and expand its longtime corporate headquarters campus in Redmond, Washington, east of Seattle.

According to Geekwire, Microsoft recently announced the architecture and contracting teams for the transformational project, which aims to replace nine existing two-story office clusters with 18 four- and five-story office blocks.

On the design side, LMN, NBBJ, WRNS Studio, and ZGF Architects are on board for the 3 million-square-foot project; Berger Partnership will act as lead landscape architect with OLIN partnering on the project as well. Microsoft has also selected Skanska, Balfour Beatty, GLY, and Sellen as general contractors for the re-do, which will affect roughly 72 acres on Microsoft’s 500-acre campus.

The project will demolish all of the of the site’s original ‘X-Wing’-style, 1980s-era office buildings, replacing those facilities and then adding a net 1.8 million-square-feet of space on top of what is existing. The new offices will be clustered into “distinct villages,” according to a Microsoft statement, with the core section aiming to be “more open and less formal” than the current campus. A rendering unveiled by Microsoft depicts glass-wrapped office buildings laid out along a skewed grid surrounding a central green containing playing fields and a bosque.

The project comes as Redmond begins to densify ahead of forthcoming transit investments that will link the city with Seattle in coming years. The first phase of the city’s Overlake Village—a 170-acre mixed-use district that will eventually house 40,000 residents—is underway and will bring 1.2 million square feet of offices, 1,400 housing units, 25,000 square feet of retail uses, a hotel, and a conference center to the town.

Microsoft aims to begin work on its $250 million campus expansion later this year with an eye toward completing the project by 2022.